Motor Insurance Claims Analysis: Gympie Road on Chermside Is Brisbane’s Worst Location for Car Crashes

Motor Insurance Claims Analysis: Gympie Road on Chermside Is Brisbane’s Worst Location for Car Crashes

Did you know that two stretches of Gympie Road, one in Chermside and another in Kedron, both appear on the list of the top hotspots for car crashes in the country, based on an analysis of motor insurance claims in Australia?



The AAMI analysis studies more than 350,000 motor insurance claims to determine which capital city roads are the most dangerous. The latest insurance claims data show the locations where most common car accidents are dominated by metropolitan areas. A number of these hotspots include arterial roads that link Central Business Districts to outlying suburbs.

In Brisbane, Gympie Road in Chermside has again ranked as the top hotspot for car crashes after settling to second place last year. The peak-hour traffic at the stretch is one of the most notorious in the state, given that it’s part of the main route serving the northern suburbs.

Gympie Road’s Chermside stretch takes out the crash crown again, securing the #1 spot after dropping to second-place last year. Peak hour traffic along Gympie Road is infamous, given it’s part of the main route serving the northern suburbs.

A stretch of Gympie Rd in Kedron is also part of the top 5 hotspots in Brisbane and the differentiator between the Chermside and Kedron stretches looks like the shopping centre. Congestion is significant in that area of Chermside.

AAMI warns motorists who are planning an outing with their family to “keep your wits about you” as traffic along this stretch of Chermside as shoppers nearby could congest the road. 

Others in the top five include:

  • Logan Road, Mount Gravatt –  regaining the same #2 spot it held in 2020
  • Morayfield Road, Morayfield – ranks #3 for three years in a row
  • Ipswich Road, Annerley – in fourth place despite dropping the speed limit to 50 km/h
  • Gympie Road, Kedron – new on the list, occupying the fifth spot.


In Queensland, nose-to-tail prangs were identified as the most common type of collision. AAMI advises motorists to “stay alert and maintain a good distance between you and the car in front of you.”

Meanwhile, data current to September 2022 from Australian Road Deaths shows a slight increase in the number of road deaths across the country with 1,211 from 1,128 last year. Drivers recorded the most incidents among road users with 586 or 48.4 per cent of the total followed by motorcyclists with 20.3 per cent. 

Read more about the AAMI Crash Index here.